Perfectly Imperfect

The goal is not to be perfect; the goal is to be accepted for the imperfections.

Category: Family

Related by blood.

Truth, Trust, and Fact

This is an old topic revisited. I have blogged (or through Facebook Notes – those were the days!) some dinosaur years ago about how we instinctively choose so-called “scientific” claims over the words of people who have spent years investing time, emotions, and love in us. Mothers Who Used to Know-It-All The pivotal character in my previous post was about…

I Don’t Care!

We Alway Care I don’t believe that we will ever not care about what other people think of or see us. We can continue to live in the delusion that we don’t care, but this phrase ‘I don’t care’ is self-explanatory. If we cared enough to make a statement out of it, it clearly illuminates the opposite. It is exactly…

Facebook Dieting Lends Focus on Studies

The Guinea Pig You know, for some odd reasons, I have been the perfect guinea pig for all sorts of ‘newly introduced’ or ‘revamped’ educational projects. Throughout my formal and higher education, I almost always landed on the ‘first time’ projects so the academic segments have been fully uprooted, reshuffled and shoved back to the unfitting hole in the ground,…

Autism: Keeping the World Out

Why does “social inclusion” play such a big part in intervention for Autism? It’s a no-brainer really. People with autism have significant difficulty in developing relationship/friendship with other people; the preferred mode is isolation. We Don’t Hate People We don’t hate people, in fact, many of us love people. We desire to build deep and meaningful relationships with other people.…

Loneliness

Once in a while, logic is put at the back burner, and emotions take over resulting in the overwhelmingly deep sense of loneliness deriving from a collision of rational reasoning and engulfing emotions. An overdrive of emotions yet leaving a sense of emptiness.

The dichotomy of emotions and rationality works like a switch, and there is also an emergency trip switch. Overwhelming and confusing emotions set off anxiety, and anxiety trips the emergency switch to high rational mode. In order to maintain functionality, we talk facts and logic, which can be unacceptable. Imagine this, when someone in your life dies, the only thing you could do was to talk about normality of life cycle – birth and death. It’s a way to explain the particular event – death – to make sense of what is happening; but it would be considered as highly insensitive and inappropriate. Our difference in coping methods divides us in times like this. There should be no right or wrong way to cope, yet our response would be considered offending.

Picking up the broken pieces

Often times, we thought of broken heart as one of the most inconsolable pains in human experiences. I won’t refute that. I realised that it is not the moment when your heart was broken that is most painful; it is the picking up the pieces that hurts most.

Pain has a way to distort our rational thoughts. Shall I say, cognitive dissonance? What we know is that the relationship was once good. We felt happy. The same thoughts that once put a smile to our face, now flow the stream of tears down our cheeks. We are suddenly convinced that those are bad thoughts, and we adjust our behaviours to align with the new feelings.

Sometimes, we confuse missing someone with hating someone. It is okay to miss someone that we may never have in our life anymore. Let the truth be truth because it is sad to have to lie to ourselves.

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